Syllabus and Readings – Course Taught at Venice

This course was taught by the four co-organizers of the Politics of Religious Freedom project in collaboration with Professors Krzysztof Drzewicki and Nazila Ghanea at the Venice School of Human Rights, European Inter-University Center for Human Rights and Democratization, in July 2011.  For updated course materials please see: “Course materials: ‘Religious Freedom and the Rights of Religious Minorities.’”

Religious Freedom and the Rights of Religious Minorities: Law, Politics, Praxis

Venice School of Human Rights

European Inter-University Center for Human Rights and Democratization

Summer 2011

 

Monday, July 4

9:30 am to 10:45 am – Introduction: Religious Freedom as a Human Right

Prof. W. F. Sullivan and Prof. P. Danchin

Required Reading:

Arcot Krishnaswami, Study of Discrimination in the Matter of Religious Rights and Practices (1960), Introduction, pp. 1-12.

Carolyn Evans, “Towards a Theory of Freedom of Religion or Belief,” in Carolyn Evans, Freedom of Religion under the European Convention on Human Rights 18-33 (2001).

Also Recommended:

Peter G. Danchin, “Islam in the Secular Nomos of the European Court of Human Rights,” 32 Michigan Journal of International Law (2011).

Winnifred Fallers Sullivan, The Impossibility of Religious Freedom (Princeton University Press, 2005).

11:00 am to 12:30 pm – Religious Freedom in the European Human Rights System

Prof. K. Drzewicki

Required Reading:

European Convention on Human Rights

‘Article 9: Freedom of Religion’, in D.J. Harris, M. O’Boyle, E.P. Bates, C.M. Buckley et al., Law of the European Convention on Human Rights, Oxford University Press, 2009, Second Edition, pp. 425-441.

Krzysztof Drzewicki, ‘European Systems for the Promotion and Protection of Human Rights’, in C. Krause and M. Scheinin (eds), International Protection of Human Rights: A Textbook, Turku / Åbo: Åbo Akademi University Institute for Human Rights, 2009, pp. 365-388 (on OSCE: at 381-388).

Also Recommended:

Thomas Burgenthal, International Human Rights in a Nutshell, St. Paul, Minn.: West Publishing Co., 1995, Second Edition, pp. 159-169.

Malcolm D. Evans, Religious Liberty and International Law in Europe, 42-144 (Cambridge University Press, 1997).

Malcolm D. Evans, Manual on the Wearing of Religious Symbols in Public Areas, (Strasbourg: Council of Europe, 2009).

2:30 pm to 4:30 pm – Case Study: OSCE – Toledo Principles on Teaching about Religion in Public Schools

Prof. K. Drzewicki

Required Reading:

OSCE Human Dimension Commitments. Volume 1: Thematic Compilation: Warsaw: OSCE/ODIHR, Second Edition, 2005.

Toledo Guiding Principles on Teaching about Religions and Beliefs in Public Schools, ODIHR Advisory Council of Experts on Freedom of Religion and Belief (2007).

Tuesday, July 5

9:30 am to 10:45 am – Religious Freedom in International Law

Prof. N. Ghanea

Required Reading:

Nazila Ghanea,”Faith in Human Rights, Human Rights in Faith,” in N. Ghanea (ed), The Challenge of Religious Discrimination at the Dawn of the New Millennium (Martinus Nijhoff, 2003) pp. 107-132.

Paul M. Taylor, Freedom of Religion: UN and European Human Rights Law and Practice (Cambridge University Press, 2005), pp. 339-351.

Also Recommended:

T. Jeremy Gunn, “The complexity of religion and the definition of ‘religion’ in international law,” 16 Harvard Human Rights Law Journal 189 (2003).

11:00 am to 12:30 pm – Religious Freedom and the UN System of Protection

Prof. N. Ghanea

Required Reading:

Brice Dickson, “The United Nations and Freedom of Religion,” 44.2 International and Comparative Law Quarterly 327 (1995).

Donna J. Sullivan, “Advancing the freedom of religion or belief through the UN Declaration on the Elimination of Religious Intolerance and Discrimination,” 82.3 American Journal of International Law 487 (1988).

Also Recommended:

Michael Wiener, “The Mandate of the Special Rapporteur on Freedom of Religion or Belief: Institutional, procedural and substantive legal issues,” 2.1 Religion and Human Rights 3 (2007).

2:30 pm to 4:30 pm – Case Study: Religious Minorities in the Middle East

Prof. N. Ghanea

Required Reading:

Johannes A van der Ven, “Religious Rights for Minorities in a Policy of Recognition,” 3.2 Religion and Human Rights 155 (2008).

Nazila Ghanea, “Religious or Minority? Examining the Realization of International Standards in Relation to Religious Minorities in the Middle East,” 36 Religion, State and Society 303 (2008).

Also Recommended:

Nazila Ghanea-Hercock, “Human Rights of Religious Minorities and of Women in the Middle East,” 26 Human Rights Quarterly 705 (2004).

Nazila Ghanea and Binesh Hass, “Seeking justice and an end to neglect: Iran’s minorities today,” Minority Rights Group International (2011), available at www.minorityrights.org/download.php?id=939

Wednesday, July 6

9:30 am to 10:45 am – What is “religion”? How is it “governed”?

Prof. E. S. Hurd
Prof. W. F. Sullivan

Required Reading:

Isaac Bashevis Singer, In My Father’s Court (Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 1991), Author’s Note & Chapters 1-5.

Lynch v. Donnelly, 565 U.S. 668 (1984).

Also Recommended:

Jonathan Z. Smith, Imagining Religion: From Babylon to Jonestown (University of Chicago, 1988), Chapter on Jonestown.

Tomoko Masuzawa, Inventing World Religions: Or How European Universalism was Preserved in the Language of Pluralism (University of Chicago, 2005).

11:00 am to 12:30 pm – Case Study: the Jewish Free School case

Prof. E. S. Hurd
Prof. W. F. Sullivan

Required Reading:

Michael L. Satlow, Creating Judaism: History, Tradition and Practice (Columbia University Press, 2006), Introduction and Chapter 1.

R(on the application of E) v Governing Body of JFS [2009] UKSC 15, 16 December 2009.

Thursday, July 7

9:30 am to 11:00 am – Secular Liberalism and its Normative Demands

Prof. S. Mahmood

Required Reading:

Saba Mahmood, “Secularism, Hermeneutics and Empire: The Politics of Islamic Reformation,” 18 Public Culture 323 (2006).

11:00 am to 12:30 pm – Case Study: Şahin & Dogru (ECHR); Case No. 8 of Judicial Year 17 (Egyptian Supreme Court)

Prof. S. Mahmood

Required Reading:

Şahin v. Turkey, App. No. 44774/98, 44 Eur. H.R. Rep. 99 (2007), pp. 8-30; 42-52.

Dogru v. France, App. No. 27058/05, 49 Eur. H.R. Rep. 179 (2008), pp. 15-24.

Nathan J. Brown & Clark B. Lombardi, “The Supreme Constitutional Court of Egypt on Islamic Law, Veiling and Civil Rights: An Annotated Translation of Supreme Constitutional Court of Egypt Case No. 8 of Judicial Year 17 (May 18, 1996) ,” 21 Am. U. Int’l L. Rev. 437 (2006) (translating Case No. 8/1996/Supreme Constitutional Court of Egypt), pp. 440-460.

Also Recommended:

Manisuli Ssenyonjo, “The Islamic Veil and Freedom of Religion, the Rights to Education and Work: A Survey of Recent International and National Cases,” 6 Chinese Journal of International Law 653 (2007).

2:30 pm to 4:30 pm“European identity and the ‘Muslim problem'”

Prof. C. Hirschkind

Required Reading:

Dainotto, Roberto. 2006. “The Discreet Charm of the Arab Thesis: Juan Andrés, Historicism, and the De-Centering of Montesquieu’s Europe.” European History Quarterly 36 (1): 7-29.

Asad, Talal. 2003. “Muslims as a ‘Religious Minority’ in Europe.” In T. Asad, Formations of the Secular: Christianity, Islam, Modernity (Stanford: Stanford University Press).

Charles Hirschkind, “Religious Difference and Democratic Pluralism: Some Recent Debates and Frameworks,” 44 Temenos (2008).

Friday, July 8

9:30 am to 10:45 am – Religious Freedom and Religious Symbols

Prof. E. S. Hurd
Prof. W. F. Sullivan

Required Reading:

Lautsi v. Italy, Application No. 30814/06, 18 March 2011 (Grand Chamber).

11:00 am to 12:30 pm Lautsi in Context

Prof. E. S. Hurd
Prof. W. F. Sullivan

Required Reading:

Alessandro Ferrari, “Civil Religion in Italy: A ‘Mission Impossible’?”, 41 George Washington International Law Review 839 (2010).

Winifred F. Sullivan, “Why Are We Talking about Civil Religion Now?: Comments on “Civil Religion in Italy: A ‘Mission Impossible’?” by Alessandro Ferrari,” 41 George Washington International Law Review 877 (2010).

Also Recommended:

Julien Ries, “Crosses” in 4 Encyclopedia of Religion 155 (Mircea Eliade ed., 1987).

Lorenzo Zucca, “Lautsi – A Commentary of the Grand Chamber decision,” International Journal of Constitutional Law (forthcoming, 2011).

2:30 pm to 4:30 pm – Transnational politics of religious freedom

Prof. E. S. Hurd
Prof. W. F. Sullivan

Required Reading:

Çitak, Zana (2009) “Between ‘Turkish Islam’ and ‘French Islam’: The Role of the Diyanet in the Conseil Français du Culte Musulman,” Journal of Ethnic and Migration Studies.

John R. Bowen (2010) “Secularism: Conceptual Genealogy or Political Dilemma?” Comparative Studies in Society and History; 52(3): 680–694.

Also Recommended:

Linell E.Cady and Elizabeth Shakman Hurd, eds. Comparative Secularisms in a Global Age (Palgrave MacMillan, 2010).

Saturday, July 9

9:30 am to 10:45 am – Religious Freedom and Legal Pluralism: Should European States Recognize Islamic Law?

Prof. E. S. Hurd
Prof. S. Mahmood
Prof. W. F. Sullivan
Prof. P. Danchin

Required Reading:

Rowan Williams. “Civil and Religious Law in England: a Religious Perspective,” 7 February 2008.

Refah Partisi v. Turkey,App. No. 41340/98, 37 Eur. H.R. Rep. 1 (2003).

Also Recommended:

Hussein Ali Agrama, “Secularism, Sovereignty, Indeterminacy: Is Egypt a Secular or a Religious State?”, 52 Comparative Studies in Society & History, pp. 495-523.

11:00 am to 12:30 pm – Conclusion: Politics of Religious Freedom

Comments are closed.